The Brooklands Society
know your cars and drivers section


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Oliver Bertram

Born in 1910, Oliver Bertram, a barrister by profession, and one of the London smart set, had no interest in road racing but was dedicated to the pursuit of speed on the Brooklands Outer Circuit.

His career started in 1929 while at Cambridge, during which time he drove various cars in hill climbs and Brooklands speed trials. His breakthrough came in 1933 when he purchased from Thompson & Taylor the ex-John Cobb 10 litre Delage in which he was soon lapping Brooklands at over 130 m.p.h. gaining his 130 m.p.h badge on the 7th August 1933. This was the car incidentally in which Kay Petre did the same thing two years later, almost to the day on 3rd August 1935, driving with a special seat and extended pedals to compensate for her 4ft. 10 in. height. (see Kay Petre). Bertram won two races and was placed highly in several others in the Delage in 1933 and 1934.

In 1935 Bertram continued to campaign the Delage, also unveiling the updated Barnato-Hassan Special now with an 8 litre Bentley engine in which on the 5th August 1935 he took the Outer Circuit lap record back from John Cobb to 142.60 m.p.h. and held it until Cobb replied two months and two days later with his ultimate record of 143.44 m.m.p.h. in the Napier Railton.

Unsurprisingly Cobb and Bertram got along pretty well and the following year, 1936, they shared the driving of the Napier Railton to take first place in the 500 Kilometres Race - a shortened version of the 500 Miles Race formulated to save the competitors money on wear and tear.

He was awarded the B.D.R.C. Track Star twice in 1935 and 1938.

 

| Introduction | Race 1 | Race 2 | The Cars | The Drivers | Track Photos |
| Performance Parameters | General Data |

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