The Brooklands Society
know your cars and drivers section


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Sammy Davis

Born in London in 1887, Sammy Davis' career began with an apprenticeship at Daimler but he was better known as a journalist and author, his nom de plume being Casque under which he wrote for Autocar.

He started competing on various motor bikes and cycle cars and was drafted into the A.C. team in 1921 and then the Aston Martin team in 1922 driving a purpose built car known as Razor Blade, owing to its slender dimensions, to ten world records and 22 national class records. In an eventful 1925 Le Mans 24 hour race in which two drivers died, he partnered Chassagne in a 3 litre Sunbeam to take second place, covering 1,343.15 miles at an average speed of 55.964 m.p.h. behind the de Courcelles/Rossignol 3 litre la Lorraine.

He raced again at Le Mans with Walter Bentley’s team in 1927 partnered by Dudley Benjafield who nursed the car home to first place after Sammy had arrived at the White House incident too late to take avoiding action, but managed to limp back to the pits where the car was pronounced still drivable.

He was recruited into the front wheel drive Alvis team in 1928 and contested the Tourist Trophy in a works team Riley. At the end of 1929 he had done enough to be awarded a B.R.D.C. Gold Star and he received a second Gold Star in 1930, the year in which he partnered Freddie March to win the B.R.D.C. 500 Miles Race.

For a journalist and illustrator he certainly achieved a lot in motor racing.

 

| Introduction | Race 1 | Race 2 | The Cars | The Drivers | Track Photos |
| Performance Parameters | General Data |

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